Showing posts with label apologetics-- Limbo. Show all posts
Showing posts with label apologetics-- Limbo. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Limbo doctrinal cheat sheet



Here is a handy list of teachings related to Limbo (sorry no time for a full article this will have to do for now):

Pope Eugene IV, Council of Florence, Session 11, Feb. 4, 1442, de fide: “Regarding children, indeed, because of danger of death, which can often take place, when no help can be brought to them by another remedy than through the sacrament of baptism, through which they are snatched from the domination of the Devil [original sin] and adopted among the sons of God, it advises that holy baptism ought not be deferred for forty or eighty days, or any time according to the observance of certain people…” (Denz. 712)

Friday, July 1, 2011

Limbo--- necessity of the Sacrament of Baptism for infants.--St. Augustine

St. Augustine, Letter to Jerome, (415AD), Letter 166:
"Wherefore whosoever tells us that any man can be made alive in the resurrection of the dead otherwise than in Christ, he is to be detested as a pestilent enemy to the common faith. Likewise, whosoever says that those children who depart out of this life without partaking of that sacrament [of Baptism] shall be made alive in Christ, certainly contradicts the apostolic declaration, and condemns the universal Church, in which it is the practice to lose no time and run in haste to administer baptism to infant children, because it is believed, as an indubitable truth, that otherwise they cannot be made alive in Christ. Now he that is not made alive in Christ must necessarily remain under the condemnation, of which the apostle says, that "by the offence of one judgment came upon all men to condemnation." Romans 5:18 That infants are born under the guilt of this offence is believed by the whole Church."
http://66.37.140.35:3000/bible/fathers/1102166.htm

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Another Reason to Believe in Limbo

The Holy Office (now the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith) in 1958 provided as follows:

"The practice has arisen in some places of delaying the conferring of Baptism for so-called reasons of convenience or of a liturgical nature--a practice favored by some opinions, lacking solid foundation, concerning the eternal salvation of infants who die without Baptism.

Therefore this Supreme Congregation, with the approval of the Holy Father, warns the faithful that infants are to be baptized as soon as possible. . . . Pastors and preachers are exhorted to urge the fulfillment of this obligation." (Apostolicae Sedis, L, 114)

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Limbo and Pope St. Zosimus's Tractoria



Limbo and Pope St. Zosimus's Tractoria

People seem to think Limbo has been erased from Catholic teaching. Not so, it is of Apostolic origin. As St. Augustin says :


St. Augustine, Letter to Jerome, (415AD), Letter 166:
"Wherefore whosoever tells us that any man can be made alive in the resurrection of the dead otherwise than in Christ, he is to be detested as a pestilent enemy to the common faith. Likewise, whosoever says that those children who depart out of this life without partaking of that sacrament [of Baptism] shall be made alive in Christ, certainly contradicts the apostolic declaration, and condemns the universal Church, in which it is the practice to lose no time and run in haste to administer baptism to infant children, because it is believed, as an indubitable truth, that otherwise they cannot be made alive in Christ. Now he that is not made alive in Christ must necessarily remain under the condemnation, of which the apostle says, that "by the offence of one judgment came upon all men to condemnation." Romans 5:18 That infants are born under the guilt of this offence is believed by the whole Church."

Augustine seems pretty sure it is a teaching from the Apostles thus making it "of the Faith" --de fide, so to attack it is to attack the Faith itself. Below we will deal with commission who seems to ignore the Apostolic teaching and the authority of Councils and Popes.

The following statements regarding The Hope of Salvation for Infants Who Die Without Being Baptized by the International Theological Commission, source: vatican.va
:


"#3....Moreover, the notion that infants who die without Baptism are deprived of the beatific vision, which has for so long beenc regarded as the common doctrine of the Church,....The necessary reconsideration of the theological issues cannot ignore the tragic consequences of original sin. Original sin implies a state of separation from Christ, and that excludes the possibility of the vision of God for those who die in that state."

"#35. a) The Pelagian understanding of the access of unbaptised infants to “eternal life” must be considered as contrary to Catholic faith."

"#40. In summary: the affirmation that infants who die without Baptism suffer the privation of the beatific vision has long been the common doctrine of the Church"

"#41. Therefore, besides the theory of Limbo (which remains a possible theological opinion)"


Then it contradicts the well established traditions that unbaptized babies cannot be saved by this conclusion:

"#102. ....Our conclusion is that the many factors that we have considered above give serious theological and liturgical grounds for hope that unbaptized infants who die will be saved and enjoy the Beatific Vision."

Of course this document isn't infallible, it even contradicts itself. (see underlined parts of lines #35 and #102)

Saturday, March 14, 2009

Reply to the Question Concerning the Salvation of Aborted Infants: In Light of the Universal Necessity of Baptism

The Fate of Unbaptized Infants In Light of the Universal Necessity of Baptism


The Fate of Unbaptized Infants In Light of the Universal Necessity of Baptism

by Mike Malone April 25th, 2005

In reply to the question concerning the salvation of aborted infants by virtue of a vicarious “baptism of desire” on the part of their parents or by “baptism of blood” on either their part or “on the part of the Church,” it can only be said that such is absolutely impossible. The Council of Trent infallibly defined the necessity of the Sacrament of Baptism, and decreed: “If anyone says Baptism is optional, that is, not necessary for salvation, let him be anathema” (De Baptismo , Canon V).